Desires vs goals ~ Do you know why your desires are failing as goals?

Goals vs Desires

I think far too often we confuse desires as goals and almost allow them to take shape as the same thing.

They are not.

Desire: a strong feeling of wanting to have something or wishing for something to happen;

Goal: the object of a person’s ambition or effort;

With that, I may desire a certain outcome but my goal may be something completely different. My desire may even be a byproduct of the necessary (big picture) goal I have designed.

What is the practical application of this…

My goal may be to work in the medical field. I may confuse that with my desire to be a doctor because I’ve glorified doctors in the medical field but I have no real intentions on pursuing all that it takes to be a doctor.

I’m fascinated with planes and my desire may be to get my pilots license but I have no real pursuit and therefore, I must realize I also have no real goal I’m putting my ambition toward.

I need reliable transportation. While my goal is to meet the need and get a decent car, my desire is a 2016 Chevy Camaro 2LT Convertible in Nightfall Gray with Kalahari Leather interior and Split Spoke Low Gloss Black wheels. Not that I’ve really looked into it or anything…

The question you have to always ask is,

“What am I doing to pursue that outcome?”

It is so important to understand the difference between goals and desires because you may be, by default, designing a system of success/failure for yourself and that is not a good thing.

When you start putting things on your goals list and not achieving them one of two things will start to happen.

  1. You get comfortable with creating goals and not achieving them. By doing so, you get less aggressive in meeting your goals.
  2. You get frustrated with goals because you realize you rarely achieve them. Then, without even realizing it, you stop setting goals.

 

In both, you create a culture in yourself that goals aren’t that important.

Neither of those are good things.

I can help with that.

Here are three steps to take:

  1. Put everything in the desire column in your head by default. Safeguard yourself by viewing the idea as a desire before you determine the goal.
  2. Break down your desire to its core purpose. What does it achieve or accomplish? It could just be that it makes you feel better or it may meet a need.
  3. Commit! If it makes it to your goal column, set a target date to accomplish it and commit!

 

This a major difference in goals versus desires.

Break the habit of creating goals from things that should be desires. You may be stopping yourself from setting future goals because you subconsciously are setting and not meeting goals.

The beauty is you get to determine your goals. If your desire is strong enough and you are committed to a specific outcome, then you have the authority and responsibility to make it a goal.

If you set something as a goal, though, you should be willing to commit to actively pursuing it.

I sincerely hope this helps.

Talk to you soon,

Rashad

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@rashadpleasant

@rashadpleasant

I am Rashad. I'm an entrepreneur with over 15 years of cultivating relationships, chasing ideas, and over delivering on promises. I want to share some of the things I've learned along the way with you. Hopefully, it will inspire you to define and achieve your personal definition of success.